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An Estimation of Electromagnetic Field Exposure from Cellular Mobile Base Station Towers in Densely Populated Residential Areas

Amar Renke, Mahesh Chavan. Published in Wireless.

Communications on Applied Electronics
Year of Publication: 2016
Publisher: Foundation of Computer Science (FCS), NY, USA
Authors: Amar Renke, Mahesh Chavan
10.5120/cae2016652039

Amar Renke and Mahesh Chavan. Article: An Estimation of Electromagnetic Field Exposure from Cellular Mobile Base Station Towers in Densely Populated Residential Areas. Communications on Applied Electronics 4(3):5-9, January 2016. Published by Foundation of Computer Science (FCS), NY, USA. BibTeX

@article{key:article,
	author = {Amar Renke and Mahesh Chavan},
	title = {Article: An Estimation of Electromagnetic Field Exposure from Cellular Mobile Base Station Towers in Densely Populated Residential Areas},
	journal = {Communications on Applied Electronics},
	year = {2016},
	volume = {4},
	number = {3},
	pages = {5-9},
	month = {January},
	note = {Published by Foundation of Computer Science (FCS), NY, USA}
}

Abstract

To increase the coverage area there is tremendous growth in cellular antenna installations on mobile towers, this increases the electromagnetic field exposure in nearby areas. This work presents measurements taken near the cellular mobile towers which are situated in densely populated urban areas in India. Measurements were conducted at distances ranging from 10m to 150m at height 1.5m and it is along the radiating direction of the antenna using a 3 axis field strength meter KM 195 to obtain power densities and electric field intensities. It was observed that most of the cellular base station antenna sites following the Indian guidelines for cellular phone radiation measurements. The average power density noted is 3479.65 μW/m2. A total 80 % of the power densities increase beyond 500 μW/m2. The amplitude of electromagnetic field exposure (EMF) depends on distance, height of base station tower, number of antennas on base station tower and direction. In densely populated residential areas the line of site distance available was up to 100m and thereafter non line of site distance exists. It is observed that line of site power density was greater than non line of site power density. The results shows that, especially in some places near the cellular base stations the power densities were more and at some other places densities were too low, it is found that there was drastic change in power density and electric field intensity everyday and by measuring the general electromagnetic field exposure one can provide this data to the agencies who were control the electromagnetic field exposure and minimize the undesirable health effects.

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Keywords

Non-Ionizing radiation, Public concerns, Power density, Electric field intensity, densely populated, Occupational exposure.